Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions

Questions about Craniosacral Therapy

Questions about Body-Centered Counseling


How do I know whether therapeutic bodywork, Craniosacral therapy, or body-centered counseling would be best for me?

If you are uncertain as to what you need, then it is best to call me for an initial phone consultation to discuss your needs. From there, during your initial session, we will meet to discuss your treatment goals. Based on your goals, it will then become clear as to which is the best treatment plan for you. Often, combining different forms of treatment can be a good option.
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Can I combine the different healing modalities that you offer?

Yes, clients often have good results by combining therapeutic bodywork, Craniosacral therapy, and body-centered counseling. Each modality offers something unique and when combined can be very helpful for your healing. Please talk with me about your exact needs.
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I keep hearing about the mind/body connection. Why is this so important in alternative healing practices?

The mind and body are one. In your everyday life, notice how stressful thoughts can create tension in your body, or how when physically sick, your mood and thoughts are affected. However, our culture tends to treat the mind and body as if they were two separate things, when in fact they are not. Many health symptoms that people experience today are a direct result of this separation. Ideally, alternative healing practices offer holistic approaches that treat the person as the whole being that they are. The healing therapies that I offer directly re-connect the body and the mind. You will often know when you are in-sync with yourself in this way because it feels wonderful.
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Do I need to have something wrong with me to schedule an appointment?

No, a common reason for a session is for wellness, personal development & curiosity. High-level wellness includes personal development and curiosity about new body/mind experiences.
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How long does a session last?

Sessions are 75 minutes in length. Before the hands-on portion of the session, there is some brief talking and some postural assessment. The hands-on portion lasts an average of 65-70 minutes. There is some talking afterwards as well.
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Can I do Craniosacral therapy while receiving treatment from other practitioners?

Yes, many people see a wide range of practitioners while receiving Craniosacral therapy.
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How many sessions will I need?

How many sessions you need depends on your individual needs and the goals of therapy. Generally, a higher number of sessions are needed for chronic concerns while fewer are needed for acute concerns. The longer the issue has been present, the longer it will take to subside after its cause has been identified and addressed. Most clients notice a distinct change after the first session, and subsequent sessions allow for that change to deepen and become more permanent. The average number of sessions is about 8 for adults.
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How long between my sessions?

Again, the frequency of your treatment plan depends on many factors, such as your reason for seeking this work, distance traveled, time available, financial resources, whether your concern is acute or chronic, and whether complementary exercise is being done between sessions. If you are scheduling your first appointment, please schedule only the first appointment; we will create a treatment plan based on an assessment in the first appointment.
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Why do Craniosacral therapists use a light touch?

With light touch, you can deeply relax into a Craniosacral session without a fear-response, which allows for significant, painless increases in movement and function. It also allows for a purely holistic approach where the mind and body can freely interrelate. Deep relaxation is helpful in order to objectively observe the emotions that contribute to your pain and restricted movement. Individuals, who at the beginning of a session may be skeptical or feel that nothing is happening, are often pleasantly surprised at the profound relaxation, the depth of release, a sensory sharpness and emotional healing experienced by the end of a session.
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Are there any dangers or contraindications associated with Craniosacral therapy?

There are no dangers at all associated with Craniosacral therapy. The only contraindication to Craniosacral therapy is recent cranial surgery or cerebral bleeding such as an aneurysm.
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How does Craniosacral therapy differ from other manual therapies?

Craniosacral therapy uses a gentle, focused touch to open and realign the body. This unique type of touch uses both subtle and larger movement to literally unwind the tension from the body’s joint and tissues. A Craniosacral therapist’s hands offer respect and trust for the client. The body/mind is able to relax into a deep state with this unique kind of touch. Within this deep state of relaxation, profound healing can occur. For further information about the similarities and differences between Craniosacral therapy and other forms of healing (chiropractic, massage therapy, energy work, psychotherapy) please read the article by Mark Levine called, ‘What is Craniosacral Therapy?’
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How can Craniosacral therapy help me with anxiety?

Craniosacral therapy works with the central nervous system. Often, anxiety is a symptom of an imbalance within this system. As your central nervous system finds its equilibrium through gentle encouragement of skilled hands, anxiety can be decreased. In essence, Craniosacral therapy reeducates your nervous system to live in a state of equilibrium. As you develop a conscious awareness of this equilibrium, your body becomes a resource for you in your life.
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How does Craniosacral therapy help Temporal Mandible Jaw (TMJ)?

Craniosacral therapy is based on the theory that the bones of the skull are moved in small amounts by the flow of the cerebral spinal fluid underneath. When there is jaw tension (often stress-related), then the jaw acts like a vice cranking down on cranial bones’ ability to move properly. This impedes the normal functioning of both the peripheral and the central nervous system. As a result, many symptoms can arise, such as headaches, neck pain, tiredness, jaw pain, numbness, and anxiety.
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Would I use Craniosacral therapy for pain unrelated to the sacrum or the cranium?

Yes. Because Craniosacral therapy treats the body holistically, many symptoms throughout the body can be helped. For example, shoulder pain can often be relieved through working in the lung area. Carpel tunnel syndrome, a repetitive motion injury of the wrist, can be addressed by working at the base of the cranium.
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I came in for headaches and jaw pain, and the Craniosacral therapist worked with my sacrum. Why did she work on parts of my body unrelated to the pain?

Your body is a connected whole. Also, your body and your mind are a connected whole. If one part is imbalanced, it can effect the whole. Craniosacral therapy is based on this principle of holism. Because of this principle, the source of your pain is often in a different location from where you actually feel the pain. In this case, your pelvis serves as a foundation from which your spine and head are held up. As a result, any imbalances in your pelvis will naturally affect the head, neck, and spine. In fact, the name ‘Craniosacral’ shows this relationship.
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I recently had my very first Craniosacral session. During the session, I experienced some unfamiliar sensations in my body. My back felt better and I felt good overall, yet I left feeling a little disoriented for the next day. Is this a normal response?

Yes, it is a normal response. Most everyone who receives Craniosacral therapy has a unique internal experience that may include: a dissolving of the bodyƕs physical boundaries, altered perception of one’s body, wave-like sensations coursing through their body, seeing a constellation of different colors, deeply felt emotions, and so on. These are all signs that the body/mind is in a state of deep healing. Though these experiences are often new and different, it is indeed the indication of a successful treatment.
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I have heard many stories about Craniosacral therapy doing great things for people. What about it makes it so helpful?

Craniosacral therapy works so well because it can go to the source of the pain. For example, a client may come in for reoccurring neck pain, headaches, and sinus trouble. Craniosacral therapy may uncover the source of the pain to be coming from unresolved trauma from an auto accident years before. The body/mind will strategically hold onto trauma until a time comes when it feels safe to process it and let it go. This survival mechanism is somewhat effective because it allows the person to survive the trauma. Yet, it takes an enormous amount of energy to maintain that survival mode for long periods of time. Eventually, the body/mind will show symptoms as it starts to weaken. As the symptoms worsen, then the person will seek help from a healthcare professional.
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Is Craniosacral therapy done in silence or does the therapist talk to the client?

There may or may not be talking during a Craniosacral session. Generally, if there is talking during a session it is for the purpose of increasing the client’s focused awareness on their present experience. When the client is relaxed and attentive during the session, it help the healing process be much more effective.
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How long has Craniosacral therapy been used to treat people?

There are two answers to your question. First, Craniosacral therapy was originally developed by an innovative osteopath in the early part of last century named Dr. William Sutherland. Since then, Craniosacral therapy has been widely practiced by a diverse range of healthcare practitioners, such as chiropractors, dentists, acupuncturists, physical therapists, naturopath doctors, massage therapists, and psychotherapists. Many healthcare professionals find it to be an important tool for helping their patients because Craniosacral therapy crosses the interface between the mind and the body. The second answer to your question is that Craniosacral therapy is ancient; it has been around for thousands of years as a successful method of healing. Since Craniosacral therapy relies upon the body’s innate healing resources, it is akin to many traditional ways of healing that people all over the world have been using successfully for a very long time.
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How does body-centered counseling differ from traditional counseling?

A goal of a body-centered approach to counseling is for your body to become a valuable resource in your life. This happens only through deep listening to yourself. Often, when your mind and your body are working together in an integrated way, your symptoms lessen, life tends to go more smoothly, and you have a greater sense of meaning and purpose. Traditional counseling often focuses on the story. This is why it is sometimes referred to as ‘the talking cure.’ Body-centered counseling instead brings your awareness (or mindfulness) into your experience in present time. The therapist directs your attention to study your internal experience as it unfolds moment to moment. Through your careful attention and helpful direction from the therapist, you slowly come into contact with the ways in which your life has been limiting. As this happens, you and the therapist gently work together to transform these limitations into new choices and opportunities to live a more fulfilling life.

It is important to note that Jeremy is not a licensed mental-health practitioner. For a licensed psychotherapist, please see the referral page.
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What is “Mindfulness?”

Mindfulness is a distinct state of consciousness. Mindfulness is characterized by relaxed volition, a gentle and sustained inward focus of attention, heightened sensitivity, freedom from judgment and effort, and the ability to notice and name the contents of consciousness.
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Can you give me an example of what might happen in a body-centered counseling session?

Here is a brief example of what a session might be like through working with Peter.

We start by sitting and talking for a bit to find out what he would like to work with during the session. Peter complains that his chronic exhaustion, insomnia, and headaches have been getting worse and that his boss has been putting more pressure on him at work. At some point, I ask him to become mindful and direct his attention inwards. Peter closes his eyes. From here, the session may take many different routes, depending on what arises in his awareness. As he turns inward into mindfulness, he begins to notice that his shoulders feel particularly heavy and rounded forward. I ask him to stay mindful of those sensations a while and see what he notices next. He reports a distinct heaviness in his chest and a slight feeling of sadness. Again, I ask him to stay with the heaviness and sadness. He takes his time feeling into the subtly of the sensations. Peter is still and very quiet. After a while, he realizes that these feelings are familiar to him. They remind him of when he was a young child and there was a death in the family. He realizes how he ended up taking care of the rest of the family in this time of crisis. As a young child, this naturally was a heavy burden for him. As he realizes this, tears come to his eyes and he cries steadily for some time. As the intensity of his feelings subsides a bit, I ask him to reflect on his current life. Peter realizes how he has unknowingly taken on an overload of responsibility. The physical symptoms he has been experiencing are a way of his body saying, ‘it’s just fine to be you without taking on all this duties.’ Afterwards, Peter reports feeling physically lighter and able to sleep at night with greater ease. There is a natural unfolding process that happens within a session when someone pays sensitive attention to their experience in these ways.

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Would I use body-centered counseling for my chronic back pain, or is it just for people with mental/emotional stress?

Body-centered counseling can be very helpful for working with your chronic pain. This is because chronic pain can sometimes overtake your life by not allowing you to live as fully as you would like. Through developing a focused attention in your body, you have the opportunity to understand the emotions and meaning behind your pain and, as a result, come into a new relationship with your pain. This can have a profoundly positive effect upon your life. The goal is for your body to become a resource so you can live the kind of life that you want.
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Does body-centered counseling use touch? If so, how is it incorporated into the work?

Yes, body-centered counseling sometimes uses touch as a tool to open you up to parts of yourself that you may not be aware of. Touch used in conjunction with mindfulness has the capacity to greatly deepen the quality and depth of a session. The touch used in this approach is distinctly different from the touch used with therapeutic massage. With massage, you are passively receiving the healing touch. Whereas the touch used with body-centered counseling will invite you to use mindfulness to actively study your inner-experience. The therapist will always introduce the use of touch within the overall context of your session. The therapist will only proceed once you understand and agree to the intention behind the touch. For example, the therapist might physically take over the feeling you have of your shoulders being heavy and rounded forward. You will then be asked to carefully notice what happens in your experience as he/she does that.
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